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the cold war in the post cold war the philippines and australia in particular to bear some of the burden. that's what i mean by an empire. i'm going to let the audience discover for your questions with the major conclusion of the book is the latest want to ask you before we turn it over what you -- you are walking away from america's historical a central role of the superpower, and you are talking about inevitable, necessary, a decline, and how would you respond. they want the american influence to extend long into the decade that they cannot do that bearing the same level of burden. of vladimir putin against china at the same time that what countries like vietnam and the philippines drag us into a war with china, over the sea is so azoff plater balancing triet in any case, the u.s. has so much oil deposits in texas, louisiana, oklahoma or other places i can name but we are doing to be -- because of energy reserves we are going to be a significant power for decades to come in any case, now is to get allies and others like minded to do more. >> this book has on the cover a blurb from henr
, the philippine-american war. but -- spanish american war and ended up in 2012. but we started in the series now. the book two years into the series, we decided, this is getting very serious, and we know i'm going to be called on this because of my background and making movies. going to say this is part fiction, part fantasy, but we decided to go with this book, and it -- peter took over the book. i was running the film, and we were cross-speaking all the time and checking each other constantly. i took about four and a half, five years now, and that where we are today. >> want to add to that? >> we've been friends for that whole period, since 1996. and then we decided we were going to go ahead with this project, and i thought we could do it in that year, a 60-minute documentary. i went to see oliver in new york two week later, and a ten-hour series, what i thought would take one semester and took four and a half years. so it's been a big project. it was important for us to have the book. i was suppressed how little information you can convey in a 60-minute documentary. so the book, it was an 800
of the stands and the uzbeckistan and kazakhstan and the south american countries, the philippines, places like that with the british american calling colonies. we send a lot of stuff for basic english. to cambodia the u.s. military is teaching the cambodians how to speak english and they are going to be reading see spot run for the different versions of those sort of things. so we are finding all over the world people want to learn english. >> if people want to donate your project what is the website? >> www.big-books.org. >> we have been talking with professor peter and this is his book o.o.p.s observing politicians stumble. we are at the naval academy to get this is book tv on c-span2.
were thrilled because nobody had been to see them. in the philippine she visited an orphanage and a training center and learning trades which can be done in the home. in south korea shoe-in to republic of korea division hospital and gave out candy and cigarettes. her brief comments indicated the state of things. quote, wounded on army cots with army blankets, soil but close end quote. during her first tour of site -- a segue to she visited institutions promoting industry training women to support themselves and their children setting up neighborhood kitchens and dispensaries. de keyser group made unscheduled stops, she felt that they were able to quote at the real picture. she concluded that in general people can since when another person is friendly and genuinely interested. that is what they tried to do, to show them, the peoples they were visiting that they rinchers to bend them as people. someone once asked pat why she could appear to be so interested in all these diverse people said she met and she said that's because i am. she said i look at the person i'm talking to and
with a bible verse because that's what they do. and it's philippines chapter two verse four. each of you should look not only to your own interests, but also to the interests of others. >> thank you very much. next i'd like to invite up trend to come and media specialist at colorado state university. >> hi, i am kiersten a senior political science major at colorado state university. he would think is a graduating senior at the number one thing i would care about would be getting a job. and i guess in a way that's what a lot of people are thinking about. but i actually want to be a local government practitioner. and so i'm thinking about the debt in a totally different way. i think if we allow things to go as they are or make a decision that isn't the right decision, will find yourself unable to provide service is to local areas that we have promised, that we need and i hope to one day be a paradise. in in addition to that, fix that has amazing core principle is that regardless of where you come from, you can find a way to rally around. so reducing spending, tax reform and entitlement reform are
information about asia once they got there. magellan dies in the philippines he runs for home. the poor guy. the captive circumnavigator remains a stock character until the 18th century when they stop taking people for information against their will. but there's still are a lot of people who go around the world probably not voluntarily. the first global health mission a vaccination campaign. they san diego ship around the world dispensing vaccine from or fins. thigh take along or fins as -- they probably did not make a decision that's the way they wanted to see the world. again, glamorous idea but a lot of people who industrial doing it by the 18th century not so glamorous. i think the last captive circumnavigator is interesting. the last so far. it would be the soviet dog. the first effort creature to travel the world. and send to the death. that practice stopped after there was international outcry about doing it to a dog. that's the last example. but there's kind of a robust history of people who probably don't people and animals who don't want to be doing this nevertheless there they ar
's argued that the u.s. acquired an empire with cuba and the philippines. yet, this were only revealed the deep differences between america and everyone else in history. for one of the first things, the american congress did after the war was pass a law requiring the united states to give up the cuba. one searches in vain for major world power to ever voluntarily departed from concord region. at the 20 century gun, a group of liberal elites who embrace the program loosely known as progressivism, challenging, criticized these four pillars. most were hostile to common-law with president woodrow wilson being the prime example of one who thought the constitution needed tv malleable and only the fittest should direct society. as america stood on the edge of american leadership, europe entered a decade in which it convinced itself war was impossible. the book, grand illusion, captured the view that europeans were too advanced, too sophisticated to fight each other. john maynard keynes a code this with his famous observation about how the world was tied together, how an englishman could order
the philippine, the woodrow wilson period, and what happens is the concept of communism comes and goes and has many phases in america but it's leiber and ties to the ideas that some of the ideals of socialism and we see it in the movement of the 1870's and we see the relationship to the french collectives of the 1870's and the 1830's. there are the working man's rights, the farm movement, the progressive movement. she kind of puts a stop on that. he comes down and goes to jail and all these people disappear and are thrown out of the country because of was world war i. so, these are the forces that are moving america. there is movement towards this place we are going to. i am curious to know what you think those forces are. where the labor movement is going to end up because they argue there are moments in history, tiffin plants things can change where there can be of wallace, they can make that convention moment. >> it could turn, and it could turn again and maybe had turned in the past view estimate it came so close. cemetery guess what he is thinking of because that is the question. >> well,
national security state story from the 1940s to now and it actually started in 1900 with the philippine american war but the spanish-american war and then in 2012, we started 1940 in the series. the book two years after our series we decided hey this is getting very serious and we know i'm going to be called on this because of my back round in making movies. people will say this is part fiction and part fantasy that we decided to go ahead and go with this book. peter took over the book. i was running the series, the film and we were cross fading all the time and checking each other constantly but it took about four and a half or five years now and that is where we are today. >> host: go ahead. >> guest: we have been friends for that whole period since 1996 and then we decided we were going to go ahead with this project and i have thought we could do it in that year and it would be a 60 minute documentary. i got to see oliver new york two weeks later and we did a 10 hour series. what i felt would take one semester ended up taking four years, four and a half years. i was surprised how lit
and the philippines, and expanding our mil-to-mil dialogue and exchanges with china. we are also enhancing our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes reality the naval fleet -- reallocating the naval fleet to achieve a 60-40 split between the pacific and atlantic oceans. hopefully will do that by 2020. increasing army and marine presence in the region, after iraq and afghanistan. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including the deployment of f-22's and the in the 22 ospreys in japan. and laying the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter in 2017. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and in the middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence. i building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe, and using these innovative rotational deployments as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can help provide for their own security. in latin america, in africa, in europe and elsewh
-- he dies in the philippines and he runs away to my we think for home, so he would have gone around the world . the campus circumnavigate remains kind of a staunch character until the midpoint of the 18th century when european stop taking people from information against their will. but there is still a lot of people who go round the world, probably not voluntarily. the first global health mission, and vaccination campaign, the spanish send a ship around the world dispensing vaccine for more funds. they take a long orphans as human incubators, said these children grow with it not make a decision that that is the way they wanted to see the world. again, glamorous idea, but a lot of the people who are doing this by the end of the 18th-century are not so glamorous. the last captives are navigator is also interesting to me last so far. mike beckham of the soviet dog. first earth creature to orbit the world. not her choice, and sent to her death. there was no recovery plan. that practice stopped after those international outcry as about doing this, even to a dog. so that is the last examp
and philippines, and above all, a partide south africa. that was the great human rights cause, the grt moral cause of that time. i knew who the players of south africa were very, very well, the name of political prisoners, the political actors, and i think i knew the politics of south africa better than the politics of my hometown. there was great concentration on south africa, banned from the olympics for many, many years. in the meantime, the olympics were held in moscow, ect.. a couple words about cuba and our relative indifference to the suffering of cubans, ordinary cubans, but also disdense, people of conscious, people who starve themselves to death for example, and hunger strikes, why the extremes? i spoke to a great many people about the problem, our indifference to cuba, and i recall one saying it was one of the most puzzling and painful phenomena of our times. there's some, many people, but i think of one in particular, a man who ought to be famous. he ought to be on the cover the "time" and "news week," and he ought to be a big deal, ought to be songs about him, poetry, movies, movies o
and the next barrier central philippines fox rebellion. another one letter quarto canal at iwo jima, the next one marked tuscon incheon and chosin reservoir in the following marked caisson, da nang and weighs city. the next-to-last one marked beirut, kuwait and somalia and the final barrier carried the names of some in of the marine corps's most recent battles, nasiriyah, baghdad and fallujah. as we exit the wire, suddenly the the battle name stops and we became part of history ourselves. now it's strange to think that just 11 years ago, last night, we all went to bed peacefully without any notions the following morning we were going to be thrown ready or not into what became the longest war in american history and it's hard now for me to imagine words like fallujah and nasiriyah and al-qaim without having some sort of emotional response. it's hard to remember what it was like to think about a date like september 11, without all the emotions it brings up. is also equally difficult to remember all my classmates and we were all like before this great burden of four was placed on our shoulders f
to the two elements. this is not -- in south china sea, china is trying to advance. with the philippines and vietnam and other countries. they claim the islands at least in south china sea. east china sea there is an issue with japan. and from japan, -- [inaudible] the taiwan, the philippines, this is called -- from the viewpoint of china. violence exists in the pacific. china openly express their strong interest in the maritime security and also the territory along those islands. so these china sea, this is not isolated when. this is a kind of china military strategy to advance. >> that's an important point. which are basically saying this is about power. and a powerful which china is going to become more powerful. they are powerful to write history. we write history. you are seeing lines challenge, and i remember talking to george soros once when, after he so go the back of england, wrote the bank of england and what he saw as a hedge fund manager as a chance to basically drive so hard against the line that fundamentally the institutional power on the bank of england site had to collap
philippines. senator enzi and i have a bill that would strengthen our relationship with the philippines called the save act. i'd like too see the administration work with the two of us to see what we could get done to have that relationship that's been so strong and has lasted so long become even closer, as we figure out how to trade with that economy in a way that makes them more stable and closer friends of the united states. and frankly we will benefit, as our work force will benefit from that agreement. there's a trans-atlantic trade agreement that puts news a putss us in a better situation to trade with the european union. this shoulyou have two mature es trying to trade with each oampleother.the normal negotiatt labor and other things that sometimes takes so longs frankly shouldn't take long. mr. president, you spent a lot of tomb with our nato partners, and they'd be the same partners that would be our trading partners, if we'll move forward there. and finally, let me say, we need a fresh trade policy for the americas. we now have trade agreements with six countries that were part of th
for war or peace in this will. t while visiting indonesia,, i thailand, and the philippines ir octoberem i was reminded of thet economic vitality of southeast h asia and the fact that the ten countries comprising. [indiscernible] represent now the fourth larges. export market of the united states. these countries are center stag. to the circumstances with chinaa we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursue prospects for a free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen american economic fac growth t.lobal more broadly, we face the, specter of global resource constraints, especially deficiencies of energy and food that can stimulate conflict and deepen poverty. made we have made gains in domestic energy production. dep we remain highly vulnerable still our dependency on oil and equally important, even if we are able to produce more energy and home, we cannot isolate to e ourselves from energy drivenave shocks to the global economy. in other words, we have to cooperate with other nations ing improving the global system of manufacturing and mov
and the philippines in october i was reminded of the economic vitality of southeast asia and the fact that the ten countries comprising represent the fourth largest export market of the united states. these countries are center stage for the circumstances with china . we must stand firm with our friends throughout asia and actively pursue prospects for free trade and open sea lanes and other policies that will strengthen america's economic growth. more broadly we face the specter of global resource constraint especially deficiencies of energy and food that can stimulate conflict and deepen poverty. we have made startling gains in domestic energy production. we remain highly vulnerable still to our dependency on oil. perhaps equally important even if we are able to produce more energy we cannot isolate ourselves from energy driven sharks to the global economy. in other words, we have to cooperate with other nations and improve the global system of manufacturing and moving and supplies. currently a key to this is helping
've done uzbekistan, kazahkstan and the south american countries, of course, the philippines, plaitses like that -- british or american colonies and then a lot of peace corps volunteers. everybody who wants to learn english. so we send a lot of stuff for basic english. we send a bunch of very basic kids' reading books to cambodia because the u.s. military or is teaching cambodians how to read english, and they're going to be reading see spot run or the updated versions of those sorts of things. we're finding all over the world people want to learn english. >> host: so if people want to donate, what's the web site? >> guest: www dot big-books.org. >> host: and we've been talking with professor stephen franzic, "oops: observing our politicians stumble." we're at the naval academy, this is booktv on c-span2. >> tell us what you think about our programming this weekend. you can tweet us @booktv, comment on our facebook wall or send us an e-mail. booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. booktv is on location at the u.s. naval acadny at nap lows -- annapolis, maryland. we're now joined
on the philippines, your efforts on the floor, your amazing humility and sense of purpose is finding the commonground and reaching out to both sides of the aisle. every member of the committee has joined, and i'm presenting you with a resolution, and i just want to read just the introduction whereas throughout his 36 years in the united states senate, richard lugar served indiana and the united states with grace, distinction, and tenacity and will have many more contributions to the nation that reveres and reveres him. we want to present this to you from everybody on the committee, my friend. >> thank you. [applause] >> mr. chairman, i thank you very much. i'm very grateful to have had this opportunity to serve with each one of you. thank you. that's a very special tribute. >> well, it's small compared to your service, but we honor you. finally, we're also going to be losing jim webb and jim demanipulate. jim, as we all know, jim webb came here, did something very few freshman can do by getting a major piece of legislation passed, the new gi bill, and on the committee, he's been really critical to o
guys in the philippines nne kramer away from home. he said he had gone around the world. the captive circumnavigate or remains kind of a stock character until the midpoint of the 18th century when europeans stop taking people for information against their will. but there still are a lot of people who go around the world, probably not voluntarily. the first global health mission, a vaccination campaign, dispensing vaccine from our friends. they take on orphans as human incubators for these children did not make a decision that's really the way they want to see the world. clamorous idea, but a lot of people doing the spreading of the 18th century, not so glamorous. the last cap in circumnavigate or is also interesting. the last sofar. first come earth creature to orbit the world, not her choice and set to reject. there was no recovery plan. that practice stopped after there was an international outcry about dreariness even to a dog. that's the last example. there's a robust history people and animals who don't want to do this, nevertheless. they are, historically famous circling around
countries like bangladesh and the philippines and charged exorbitant fees to travel to their work sites often misled about where they're going, what that are salaries will be and what their living conditions will be like. frequently their passports are confiscated so they cannot in fact return home, even if they're able to scrape together the money to make that journey. this kind of human trafficking is no less than modern-day slavery, subsidized by our government with taxpayer money. it's reprehensible. but for me, the number-one issue here is the safety of our american troops on these bases. that safety is compromised if our bases are filled with unauthorized, potentially unsafe foreign workers. and that's why i introduced the end trafficking in government contracting act of treft which provides the -- of 2012 which provides the most comprehensive approach taken. it is bipartisan legislation which now is included in the bill which passed the senate last week and i'm hopeful will be retained in conference and signed into law soon, with strong bipartisan support from my colleague, senat
on the fed. i wouldn't wipe out capital losses because central banks were in the philippines from their central bank had a huge negative equity. the central banks can go on without necessarily having a positive equity. secondly, they have all sorts of tools that they can theoretically use, other than having to unwind their balance sheet. they can increase reserve ratios that they can increase interest rates they pay out excess reserves and so on. so they have a lot of control out there, which makes me less worried about the fed ellen sheets. not that i approved of what they were doing recently. but i think they can get out of there fairly easily. >> i would just add that the president had this massive undertaking, you know, in almost a desperate wickets at the underlying problem. this is a fiscal policy issue and we have an absolute lack of leadership. this fact of the tax policy, much of which has been in place for over a decade is a completely congressionally made thing in congress and the president had refused to work on it until now. so likewise they refuse to substantively ta
with allies and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our milton a dialogue and exchanges with china. we are also enhancing our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes reallocating the naval fleet to achieve in the next few years a 63 coo 40 split between the pacific and the land goshen's. hopefully we will do that by 2020. the increasing army and marine presence in the region after iraq and afghanistan locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific including the new plans as f-22 is and the envy 22 to japan. laying the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f35 joint strike fighter in 27 tiberi. the strategy is that as we do force projection for in the asia-pacific and in the middle east we still have to maintain our golden leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovation deployments as a way to do exercises and training with other countries developing their capabilities so that they can help provide for their own security and latin america and africa
, and it stands as an amazing legacy. but i will always remember the work we did on the philippines. your efforts on the floor, you've always had this amazing humility and sense of purpose in finding the common ground and reaching out to people on both sides of the i'm. every member of the committee has joined in presenting you with a resolution, and i just want to read just the introduction. whereas throughout his 36 years in the united states senate richard hue garre has served indiana, the united states with grace, distinction and tenacity and will have many more contributions to a nation still he reveres and that reveres him. and we want to present this to you, everybody on the committee, my friend. [applause] >> mr. chairman, i thank you very much. i'm very grateful to have had this opportunity to serve with each one of you. thank you. it's a very special tribute. >> thank you, sir. well, it's small compare today your service, but we honor you. and then, finally, we're also going to be losing jim webb and jim demint. jim, as we all know, jim webb came here, did something very few freshmen ca
the first filipina judge, man or woman, to sit on the federal bench. so the great nation of the philippines, which contributes so many immigrants and then citizens to our country, can be very proud that miss schofield has risen to this high post once she's confirmed. in conclusion, i believe she'll make a terrific judge and i look forward to her nomination -- confirmation today. and with that, mr. president, i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? mr. cornyn: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from texas. mr. cornyn: mr. president, can you tell me how much time is remaining on this side? the presiding officer: 15 minutes. mr. cornyn: thank you. mr. president, it's become disturbingly clear that president obama doesn't mind whether or not we drive off the fiscal cliff. just last week, his own treasury secretary, secretary geithner, said the white house was -- quote -- "absolutely" prepared to go off the cliff unless republicans agree to raise marginal tax rates. in other words, during a period of high unemployment -- the highest since the great depression -- the president
fought to honor the veterans who served the commonwealth army of the philippines on the side of the united states during world war ii. because of a law passed in 1946, their service was not recognized. they were denied access to health care, given only half of the disability and death compensation of other u.s. veterans, so senator inouye changed that. over the years he secured nearly $200 million in compensation for filipino veterans, and he fought to grant filipino veterans the same access to u.s. veterans and v.a. hospitals as are other veterans. senator inouye's strong sense of honor and justice drove him to fight for the recognition of these veteran services. he was fond of saying, quote, "justice is just a matter of continuing education." end quote. and for that reason, he also made sure that injustices endured by u.s. citizens and permanent residents of japanese an ssess century during world war ii were never forgotten. he led passage of the civil liberties act of 188, which acknowledged -- 1988, which acknowledged their forced internment and provided compensation for
about the capitol asset on the balance sheet because central banks worked in the philippines. the central bank had a huge negative equity. central banks can go on without necessarily having a positive equity. secondly, they have all sorts of tools that they can theoretically use other than having to unwind their balance sheets. they can increase their ratios, increase the interest rate they pay on excess reserves and so on. they have a lot of control which makes me less worried about the fed balance sheet, not that i approve of what they were doing recently, but i think they can get out of the -- fairly easily. >> i would just add that i think the presence of this massive fed undertaking, you know, and almost a desperate kind of way gets that the underlying problem. this is not a monetary policy issue. this is a fiscal policy issue, and we have an absolute lack of leaders, this threat of that tax policy expiration, all tax policy, much seven -- much of been in place for over a decade. completely congressionally made thing in congress and the president have refused to work on
is a strategic ally of ours in the western pacific near guam and the philippines and indonesia. last year our defense department wrote "failure to follow through on our commitments to palau as reflected in the proposed agreement would jeopardize our defense posture in the western pacific." it's important that the u.s. demonstrate its reliability as a strategic partner in the pacific by approving this 2010 agreement with palau and meeting our commitments. i urge my colleagues to support the amendment. the presiding officer: who yields time in opposition? mr. bingaman: i'm happy to see the matter dealt with a voice vote. ms. mikulski: i move the amendment be adopted by voice. the presiding officer: if there is no further debate on the amendment, all those -- mr. cochran: the senator from mississippi. mr. sessions: i object to the voice vote. i ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. mr. sessions: on -- to speak on this remaining? the presiding officer: there is 30 seconds remaining in opposition. mr. sessions: madam president, this is
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)